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Video: GAM Safety Couplings – Direct Drive vs. Indirect Drive May 7, 2013

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Safety couplings are used to minimize expensive damage when a collision occurs in a high performance servo drive system.  When a collision occurs, the safety coupling will stop the destructive inertial forces instantly and eliminate downtime and repair costs often associated when just an overload relay is used.

Click on the link below to view a YouTube Video on the operation of a Gam Direct Drive Safety Coupling, or click on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HyoOw8B9gQ8  .

Gam Direct Drive Safety Coupling Video

Gam Direct Drive Safety Coupling Video

Click on the link below to view a YouTube Video on the operation of a Gam Indirect Drive Safety Coupling, or click on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AJEMVK1CnQo .

Gam Indirect Drive Safety Coupling Video

Gam Indirect Drive Safety Coupling Video

For additional information on the Safety Couplings from Gam, click on the link below-

http://www.servo2go.com/search.php?search=safety coupling&D=PROD

For more information, please contact:

Editorial Contact:

Warren Osak
sales@servo2go.com
Toll Free Phone:  877-378-0240
Toll Free Fax:   877-378-0249
www.servo2go.com

Join the New LinkedIn Group ‘Motion Control Fundamentals’ March 4, 2013

Posted by Servo2Go.com in News & Events, Product Video's, Technical Support Information.
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Motion Control Fundamentals LinkedIn Group

Motion Control Fundamentals LinkedIn Group

Created by Electromate.com, this Technical Group strives to advance the knowledge of the fundamentals of Electro-mechanical Motion Control.  We welcome regular posts by group members of any Technical Notes & White Papers, Video’s, Webinars, Podcasts, Engineering Formulae, Sizing Software, etc., related to the discipline of Motion Control.  We appreciate your participation and encourage your comments.

If you are novice or technically proficient user of Motion Control products/systems, please join this group.  No Job Postings please.

Click on the link below to join now.

 

http://www.linkedin.com/groups/Motion-Control-Fundamentals-4883684/about

Tags: Motion Control, Motor Control, Machine Control, Mechatronics, High-Tech Systems, Robotics, Automation, Servo Systems, Stepper Systems, Linear Motion, Rotary Motion

Finding the Index on an Incremental Encoder with a DMM January 31, 2013

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Sometimes you don’t have the right tools to do the job.

Lets say you needed to identify where the index pulse was firing on your incremental encoder, but you left your oscilloscope in your other jacket pocket, and now all you have on hand is a DMM.

Well fear not, finding the index with a multimeter is possible although a bit tedious.

The index fires once per revolution and at higher line counts this makes it VERY easy to miss.   Since there is some delay in a multimeter’s display time, you will need to rotate the encoder very slowly to catch a change in voltage level.

The Blue box has a nine-volt battery inside that I regulated down to 5Vdc for the encoder power.   I have pulled out connections to ground (Black wire) and the index channel (Orange wire).  When the index fires, the voltage will go from zero to five volts.

More information on the encoders from Quantum Devices can be found at the link below-

http://www.servo2go.com/supplier.php?id=1057843244

For more information, please contact:

Editorial Contact:

Warren Osak
sales@servo2go.com
Toll Free Phone:  877-378-0240
Toll Free Fax:   877-378-0249
www.servo2go.com

 

Webinar- Applying Stepper Motors: Application Questions You Must Answer & Things to Watch Out For December 16, 2012

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ElectroCraft Stepper Motor

ElectroCraft Stepper Motor

(Recorded: Tuesday, June 26, 2012, 2:00 pm ET)

This pre-recorded webinar will review some of the basic parameters necessary to properly select and apply stepper motor technology to motion applications. Topics included in this discussion will be a review of basic stepper speed-torque behavior including the stepper over-voltage ratio, a stepper in constant current operation vs. a stepper in voltage drive region, thermal ratings, the impact of winding changes on dynamic behavior, calculations and considerations for intermittent duty operation, motor/system accuracy, failure modes, and the application of all these criterion when applying stepper-based linear actuator product.

Engineers currently using stepper technology in their motion applications want to understand how to apply stepper motor technology to get the best result should attend this webinar.

In this webinar you will learn:

-Basic parameters necessary to properly select and apply stepper motor technology

-How to understand the stepper motor speed-torque curve and how to apply this to the application

-The main factors to consider when trying to optimize a stepper motor in a variety of applications

Speaker:
Tim Burke
Chief Engineer, ElectroCraft

Click on the link below to view the prerecorded Seminar-
http://video.webcasts.com/events/pmny001/viewer/index.jsp?eventid=42737

For more information on the Stepper Motor products from ElectroCraft, click on the link below-

http://www.servo2go.com/supplier.php?id=1189973790

For more information, please contact:

Editorial Contact:

Warren Osak
sales@servo2go.com
Toll Free Phone:  877-378-0240
Toll Free Fax:   877-378-0249
www.servo2go.com

EtherCAT and DxM Technology Reviewed at RoboBusiness 2012 November 5, 2012

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Interview on Engineering TV with Karl Meier.   4 minute video.

Bill Wong of Electronic Design magazine talks to Karl Meier, Marketing Manager at Advanced Motion Controls about EtherCAT and DXM Technology for very efficient industrial networking.

OEM’s are continually challenged to provide motion control precision at lowest possible cost.  Precision has been given a boost with the advent of EtherCAT®, an open Ethernet-based network standard setting new heights for real-time performance and topology flexibility, and has been the fastest growing area in motion control technology.   Advanced Motion Controls has created exclusive ‘DxM’ – Demultiplexed Motion technology allowing connectivity of up to 3 DZS drives (sub-nodes) to a single DZE (node) on an EtherCAT® network for up to 4 axes of servo motion.  Removing the cost of additional EtherCAT® nodes greatly reduces overall system cost.  ‘DxM’ Technology handles all sub-node activity easily through one node, making master tasks much simpler in multi-axis systems.

Click on the link below to view a demonstration of AMC’s DxM Technology.

Advanced Motion Control DxM Technology Video

The 4 minute video can also be viewed at the link below-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aEqHAxnd87A&feature=youtube_gdata

For more information on the DxM Technology from Advanced Motion Controls , click on the link below-

http://www.servo2go.com/search.php?search=DxM&D=PROD

For more information, please contact:

Editorial Contact:

Warren Osak
sales@servo2go.com
Toll Free Phone:  877-378-0240
Toll Free Fax:   877-378-0249
www.servo2go.com

Galil DMC-4080 Helps Guide Remote Controlled Vehicle Used in Hyper-Realistic Military Training September 26, 2012

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There’s a big lump in the throat of the infantryman as he sees the dented, dirty sedan quickly approaching the checkpoint after exiting the bomb-riddled village and well-known terrorist stronghold.  With his M-16 poised and adrenaline rushing, he peers in to identify the driver behind the dusty windshield.  Is this the enemy?  Are these civilians?

A warning shot is fired, but the car speeds up, and shots to flatten the tires are not slowing this maniac down.  The soldier fires again.  This time, the windshield bursts and blood splatters from the driver’s forehead as the sedan screeches to a halt.

For the infantryman, he can breathe a sigh of relief.  Not only for a job well done, but because he also knows that the village and enemy combatant isn’t real—no matter how real it all seemed at the time.

The sedan is primarily made of hardened foam.  The enemy is a dummy—literally.  Even the blood isn’t real

They’re all props set up by Strategic Operations, Inc. (STOPS), a San Diego-based company specializing in creating Hyper-Realistic™ training environments for military, law enforcement and homeland security operations.  Since 2002, the company has provided such training to over 450,000 Marines, soldiers, sailors and Coast Guard personnel to prepare them for the battlefields of Iraq, Afghanistan and other hostile places.

“Our company uses movie-industry special effects along with actual military tactics, and provides everything you can think of to re-create wartime environments with hyper-realistic scenarios.  This includes props ranging from full-out villages, buildings and vehicles to live actors and realistic dummies with all the fake blood, guts and weaponry.  The purpose is to train the military by placing them in action-packed, real-life combat situations so they can respond quickly and without panic, and be prepared and sensitized for any battlefield situation,” said Kit Lavell, Executive Vice-President of STOPS.

There appears to be no limits when it comes to the level of “hyper” realism.  For example, to simulate the horror of combat wounds, the company has employed amputee actors who will wear prosthetic limbs designed to fly off with “blood” spurting when they are shot or blown-up.

“Participants (trainees) so willingly suspend disbelief that they become totally immersed and, eventually, stress inoculated,” Lavell adds.

Adding to this realism is STOPS’ Ballistic Unmanned Ground Vehicle (BUGV) used for preparing soldiers for live-fire vehicle check point/entry control point scenarios, for sniper training, and for dealing with vehicles that have been converted into mobile bombs.  It features an expendable lightweight foam body that can be designed and formed to simulate a sedan, taxi, bongo or pickup truck and more.  It rests on a ballistic steel frame capable of holding up against a barrage of real .50 caliber bullets.

Of course, no live driver sits in the BUGV; just hyper realistic foam mannequins of all nationalities.  Real people, of course, are employed to operate the vehicle via a sophisticated remote control device, with key driving functions managed by a DMC-4080 8-axis Ethernet motion controller from Galil Motion Control, Rocklin, CA.  The controller also incorporates two Galil D3040 4-axis, 500W drives with each capable of operating at voltages between 20V and 80V.

Three of the axes of the Galil controller control the steering, shifting and throttle actions, while a fourth axis is used for additional steering requirements. Another axis is used for controlling a machine gun mounted inside the vehicle and which fires blanks at the trainees.  The remaining three axes are reserved for testing and other features. STOPS uses some of the controller input/output (I/O) to operate relays that energize such functions as the ignition or turn signals.

A key factor why STOPS specified the Galil controller is its ability to function with utmost reliability inside a vehicle subject to extremely harsh conditions, like wide-ranging temperatures of -10°C to 65°C; dusty, loose and uneven terrain; real ammunition and explosives; and chemicals.

For STOPS, failure is not an option with the controller.

“The overall robustness of the Galil controller is impressive,” said Lavell, who liked how the Tell Torque feature of the DMC-4080 takes readings from the motor of the BUG-V to determine the harshness of the terrain it is on, and then delivers its findings to the remote control “driver” so he can either ease down or rev up the engine accordingly.

Other Galil features play significant roles in operating the BUGV, such as the Homing Routine and Limits feature which allows for safe power-up of the vehicle and re-centering of the wheels for each training session.

“We also use Galil’s Position Tracking Mode to send position data streams from the host to the four axes used for driving the BUGV.  The data throughput is excellent, with no issues, no latency,” said Lavell.

STOPS engineers found the native Galil programming language easy-to-use, which helped enable them to incorporate several safety routines into the operating system.  For example, whenever the controller does not receive a data stream, it goes into a fail-safe routine that brings the vehicle to a stop.

The BUGV is proving to be an effective way to prepare soldiers for combat in urban environments.  Officially referred to as “Military Operations on Urbanized Terrain” or MOUT, these are military actions planned and conducted on a terrain complex where man-made construction such as residences and buildings, along with increased population (as opposed to rural areas), affects the tactical options available to the commander.

“A checkpoint in Afghanistan is a typical MOUT scenario,” explained Lavell.  “When a vehicle approaches, the Rules of Engagement go into effect.  If the vehicle doesn’t respond to a warning shot within a certain number of meters, then there is an escalation of the response: first, fire a warning, then shoot the tires, then shoot the engine block, and then shoot the occupant.  This is quite challenging to train for because in the field the aspect ratio of the approaching vehicle is difficult to judge.  The Hyper-Realistic training simulation using the BUGV helps the training solder see what the approaching vehicle looks like at 300 meters, then 200 meters, then 100 meters and closer.”

It turns out that having the increased use of a training vehicle like the BUGV doesn’t just train soldiers to become more effective fighters, it also helps to increase their own survivability.  According to the Defense Science Board, the probability of being a casualty decreases significantly after the first few “decisive combats.”

Typically, STOPS takes a week’s time to customize a MOUT training system, including re-creating enemy villages.  “We can create real environments that look like any place in the world, such as in Afghanistan or Iraq.  The buildings and villages are not only realistic, they are modular so they can quickly be built and re-built after they’ve been shot or blown up,” said Lavell.

For more information on the Galil DMC-4080 Controller, click on the link below-

http://www.servo2go.com/product.php?ID=101658

For more information, please contact:

Editorial Contact:

Warren Osak
sales@servo2go.com
Toll Free Phone:  877-378-0240
Toll Free Fax:       877-378-0249
www.servo2go.com

New Video Library: How to use Exor’s UniOP Designer 32 HMI Software September 11, 2012

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Exor UniOP HMI Family

Exor UniOP HMI Family

This set of videos shows you how to work with Exor’s powerful & flexible UniOP Designer 32 HMI software.   Learn how create a new project, download a project, use macro commands, alarms, tags, dynamic graphics and much more.

Click on the link below to view the video library.

http://www.exor-rd.com/designer_video.html

For more information on Exor’s line of HMI’s and Operator Displays, click on the link below-

http://www.servo2go.com/supplier.php?id=1122316842

For more information, please contact:

Editorial Contact:

Warren Osak
sales@servo2go.com
Toll Free Phone:  877-378-0240
Toll Free Fax:       877-378-0249
www.servo2go.com

XYZ Gantry Carries the Load August 21, 2012

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Zaber Technologies G-LSQ XYZ Gantry System

Zaber Technologies G-LSQ XYZ Gantry System

This video shows a 450 mm travel, low profile, XY Gantry system with a 150 mm Z-axis. This system is composed of several LSQ stages and three stepper motor controllers. Cable carriers are included to provide increased cable protection and to reduce wiring clutter.

Combining several linear low-profile stages, this gantry system is decked out for multi-axis applications that have to support heavier loads.  Flex cables run neatly to three stepper motor controllers, keeping system movement reliable and uncluttered.  The system supports loads to 18 kg and can reach speeds of 330 mm/s.

For more information on the G-LSQ XYZ Gantry System from Zaber Technologies, click on the link below- http://www.servo2go.com/product.php?ID=105304

For more information, please contact:

Editorial Contact:

Warren Osak
sales@servo2go.com
Toll Free Phone:  877-378-0240
Toll Free Fax:       877-378-0249
www.servo2go.com

Zaber Technologies G-LSQ XYZ Gantry System Video July 19, 2012

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Zaber G-LSQ Gantry Video

Zaber G-LSQ Gantry Video

This video shows a 450 mm travel, low profile, XY Gantry system with a 150 mm Z-axis. This system is composed of several LSQ stages and three stepper motor controllers. Cable carriers are included to provide increased cable protection and to reduce wiring clutter.

For more information on the G-LSQ Gantry Systems from Zaber, click on the link below:

http://www.servo2go.com/product.php?ID=105304&cat=

For more information, please contact:

Editorial Contact:

Warren Osak
sales@servo2go.com
Toll Free Phone:  877-378-0240
Toll Free Fax:       877-378-0249
www.servo2go.com

2-Minute Video: How to Connect a Galil Controller to Ethernet May 16, 2012

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 2-Minute Video: How to Connect a Galil Controller to Ethernet

This instructional video shows how to easily connect a Galil controller to Ethernet. Video demonstrates how to assign an IP address and connect to the Ethernet using GalilSuite software. >> Watch video

Information Galil’s Ethernet Motion Controllers can be found at-
http://www.servo2go.com/search.php?search=Stand-Alone%20Motion%20Controller&D=PROD

For more information, please contact:

Editorial Contact:

Warren Osak
sales@servo2go.com
Toll Free Phone:  877-378-0240
Toll Free Fax:       877-378-0249
www.servo2go.com