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Check Out Our Servo Products Datasheet October 16, 2012

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Applied Motion Products is pleased to announce the release of a new, 16 page Servo Products Datasheet.  This colorful brochure details our broad servo system offering, with M and V series motors ranging from 50 to 750 watts of continuous output power and both AC and DC powered drives from our popular BLu and SV lines.  All motors include precision incremental encoder feedback. Drives can be operated in torque, velocity or positioning modes, can execute stored Q or Si programs, as well as streaming commands delivered over RS-232, RS-485, Ethernet, EtherNet/IP and CANopen communication interfaces. All systems include easy to use set up and tuning software at no cost.

Applied Motion Products Servo Products Catalog

Applied Motion Products Servo Products Catalog

Popular accessories include extension cables, break out boards, regeneration clamps and communication adapters.

For more information on the Servo Products from Applied Motion Products, click on the link below-

http://www.servo2go.com/search.php?search=Quick Tuner&D=PROD

For more information, please contact:

Editorial Contact:

Warren Osak
sales@servo2go.com
Toll Free Phone:  877-378-0240
Toll Free Fax:   877-378-0249
www.servo2go.com

Whitepaper – Gearmotors: Achieving the Perfect Motor & Gearbox Match August 23, 2012

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Groschopp Fractional HP Gearmotor & Motor Whitepaper

Groschopp Fractional HP Gearmotor & Motor Whitepaper

For electrical and mechanical design engineers in the process of developing applications, choosing a gearmotor can be a tricky and arduous process. Can motors and gearboxes be purchased separately and then matched for an application? Is it better to specify a pre-engineered gearmotor? What are the differences?

Focusing on how to choose the right motor/gearbox combination for your OEM application; Engineering Manager, Seth Hulst and Design Engineer, Loren Kamstra explain cost optimization, performance and other critical application considerations. Outlining the basic motor and gearmotor types and the advantages of each choice will help a designer more easily calculate and choose the best gearmotor for the required application. Even if a new gearmotor is not needed immediately, many of the ideas presented will help audit a current gearmotor’s performance within an application.

Learn how to:

  • Interpret ratings and characteristics of various gearbox types as a “total picture”
  • Select the right motor based on gearbox ratings
  • Identify key application and performance characteristics (beyond speed, torque and life) such as yield strength, operating speed, mounting position, and loading
  • Avoid common mistakes such as selecting a motor that is too large, problems with overheating, and miscalculating yield torque
  • Why thermal and mechanical factors limit gearbox efficiency and performance
  • Understand the effect of torque density on the heat and life of a motor
  • Tips for selecting the correct gearbox ratio

Click on the link below to download this Free Whitepaper

http://www.groschopp.com/wp-content/uploads/Gearmotors-Achieving-the-Perfect-Motor-Gearbox-Match_Groschopp.pdf

For more information on the DC Motor and Gearmotor Products from Groschopp, click on the link below-

http://www.electromate.com/products/?partner=1210613528

For more information, please contact:

Editorial Contact:

Warren Osak
sales@servo2go.com
Toll Free Phone:  877-378-0240
Toll Free Fax:       877-378-0249
www.servo2go.com

New Product: STM23 Integrated Stepper Motor with EtherNet June 4, 2012

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Applied Motion Products' STM23 Integrated Step Motor with EtherNet

Applied Motion Products’ STM23 Integrated Step Motor with EtherNet

Applied Motion Products is pleased to announce the addition of eight integrated drive+motors to our line of Ethernet and EtherNet/IP motion control products.

The new STM23 models fuse a high performance motion controller with 100 MBit Ethernet communications to a high torque NEMA23 step motor.  Connecting to an Allen-Bradley ControlLogix, CompactLogix or MicroLogix PLC?  EtherNet/IP is also available.

The STM23Q-2Ex provides 125 ounce inches of torque, while the longer STM23Q-3Ex produces 210 ounce inches.  Both models are available with an optional 4000 count/rev optical encoder, safely housed inside, that can detect and prevent motor stalls using Applied Motion’s proprietary stall prevention algorithm.  Our auto tuned digital current control provides smooth, quiet motion, while an advanced anti-resonance algorithm with electronic damping allows for maximum torque utilization, rapid acceleration, and fast settling times.

Software applications can communicate with the STM23 in real time, using the SCL and Q languages over standard 100 megabit Ethernet cabling, addressing and protocols.  Ethernet can transmit data at 100 times the speed of CANopen and more than 1000 times faster than RS-232 and RS-485.  The number and types of devices that can share a network are practically unlimited.

Even if you are just programming a Q drive for standalone operation, the Ethernet option can be more convenient than chasing down a USB-serial converter and trying to remember which COM port it uses.  Just plug the drive into your office network, install our free, easy to use software, and you’re ready for programming and configuration.

50 piece pricing begins at $371 US/ea.  Delivery is 1-2 weeks.

For more information on the STM23 Integrated Step Motor with EtherNet from Applied Motion Products, click on the link below:

http://servo2go.com/product.php?ID=102267&cat=

For more information, please contact:

Editorial Contact:

Warren Osak
sales@servo2go.com
Toll Free Phone:  877-378-0240
Toll Free Fax:       877-378-0249
www.servo2go.com

How To: Reduce Noise Output from a Brushed Motor April 19, 2012

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Pittman's Brush DC Motor Family

Pittman's Brush DC Motor Family

Noise is often the single toughest challenge faced by design engineers when developing products especially in medical applications.

The inherent noise issue with many types of motors is the brushes.  Brushes create mechanical and electrical noise due to friction against the commutator, as well as arcing caused by current conducting through the brush and commutator.  A reduction in noise level of 10 decibels is an impressive achievement.  The decibel scale is logarithmic, not linear. Every three dB decrease of the sound level cuts the intensity of the sound by half.

 

Examine the following factors to reduced noise:

  • Look into different varnishing processes
  • Inquire about custom carbon brushes
  • Tighten machining tolerances

The data shown in the graph represents the 1/3 octave band testing data taken on a PMDC motor before and after the bullet pointed customizations.

For design engineers working on a noise reduction project, the motor design is only a part of the challenge. Radiated noise can be amplified through the other components in the system. Here are some additional tips for reducing noise:

  • Avoid using sheet metal and structural components that will resonate with the motor
  • In some cases, the use of vibration isolators to mount the motor can help
  • Accurately align of the driven components to the motor

*Note: the higher the RPM of the motor the more sound will be radiated from the motor.

Click on the link below for information on the Servo Motors available from Servo2Go.com –

Servo2Go’s Servo Motor Product Family

For more information, please contact:

EDITORIAL CONTACT:
Warren Osak
sales@servo2go.com 
Toll Free Phone:   877-378-0240
Toll Free Fax:       877-378-0249
www.servo2go.com

How to Calculate Motor Torque Constant April 3, 2012

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The torque constant, Kt, of a motor is a very useful parameter for sizing and controlling motors showing a linear speed / torque relationship.  Both DC brush type and brushless motors exhibit this linear performance curve relationship.

Servo2Go's Brushless Servo Motor Family

Servo2Go's Brushless Servo Motor Family

Without getting into theoretical detail, Kt is simply the slope of the torque / current curve of a motor.   The units of the constant are found in torque units per amp. (e.g. N-m/amp, oz-in/amp, etc.) Kt can be useful in both design and application.  Looking at the current in the system the designer or control system can calculate the actual torque output of the motor during operation.  This can be used in a variety of ways.  It allows the designer to understand the actual load that is seen in the application and understand if the optimal motor for the application is being used.   On the control side, a control can be set up with a current limit to ensure that the mechanical system is not over loaded or it can be used to assure that the motor does not overheat during use.  

Additionally, Kt is used in torque mode applications to maintain a controlled amount of torque to meet the application needs.  Example:  The power source for the application allows for the motor to draw a maximum current of 10 amps. Based on the design, you need to drive a maximum load of 10N-m. What is the minimum Kt needed for this application?

It should be noted that the parameter Kt is not related to the voltage under which the motor is operated.   If you use the motor at 12VDC or 24VDC this constant will remain the same.  This attribute of the motor is very useful as the motor is used in a motion control system.   The overall torque output of the DC motor system is maintained by monitoring current while the motor’s speed output is varied by controlling the voltage into the motor.

Click on the link below for information on the Servo Motors available from Servo2Go.com –

Servo2Go’s Servo Motor Product Family

For more information, please contact:

EDITORIAL CONTACT:
Warren Osak
sales@servo2go.com 
Toll Free Phone:   877-378-0240
Toll Free Fax:       877-378-0249
www.servo2go.com

Reducing cogging torque in brushless motors March 29, 2012

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Selecting the number of rotor poles and slot combinations to reduce cogging is not an intuitive exercise.  Take advantage of these guidelines based on pretested configurations to help you optimize your next motor design.

Cogging torque in dc brushless motors comes from variations in magnetic field density around a rotor’s permanent magnets as they pass the nonuniform geometry of the slot openings in the stator.  In applications such as servosystems and spindle drives, the pulsating speed that cogging generates can blemish machined surfaces or reduce position accuracy. 

Unfortunately, classical electromagnetic calculations do not provide the data needed to determine how much cogging torque might develop in a new paper design.  Although a complete finite-element analysis may be an alternative to manual methods, it usually requires more project time than is available.  In most cases, several prototypes must be made to measure and eventually reduce the cogging torque.  Thus, it is critical to have a simple check list of major factors that determine cogging torque during the initial design procedure so several iterations can be made before finalizing the drawings.

Major factors affecting cogging torque include magnetic wave shapes, air-gap length, slot opening, number of stator slots and rotor poles, skewing, copper fill, pole pitch, flux distribution or density, magnet volume, and material weight.  Relationships between some of these factors, including electrical degrees/cycle, and cycles/rev vary among multiple-pole motors.  

Analyzing the ripple torque for each type leads to a set of guidelines for new designs.  For example, the maximum number of cycles in one electrical cycle for a stator with an even number of slots can equal the number of slots itself.  But for a motor with an odd number of slots, the number of cycles can be twice the number of slots.

Moreover, for a given frame size and type of lamination, slot and pole combinations as well as different pole arc to pitch ratios and magnetization, can produce different cogging torques.  Keeping the number of poles on both rotor and stator ID and slot openings constant, and varying the number of slots, shows how cogging torque behaves for different slot and pole combinations.

Skewing the magnets or the stator core often can lower cogging a bit more.  When a design without skewing already shows minimal cogging, the skew angle required to reduce cogging below a particular value will be much smaller.  Also, designing for a trapezoidal or nearly sinusoidal air-gap wave-form (made by varying the pole arc to pole-pitch ratio) is a common practice that often reduces cogging torque even further.

Click on the link below for information on the Servo Motors available from Servo2Go.com –

Servo2Go’s Servo Motor Product Family

For more information, please contact:

EDITORIAL CONTACT:
Warren Osak
sales@servo2go.com 
Toll Free Phone:   877-378-0240
Toll Free Fax:       877-378-0249
www.servo2go.com

The Many Uses of Encoder Feedback March 22, 2012

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Step motors are popular in part because they are low cost and easy to use.  But experienced users know that if the system demands more torque than the motor has available, the motor stalls.  Compounding the situation is the fact that stepper systems don’t require feedback, so other devices in the system are unlikely to be aware of the stall.  However, by adding an inexpensive encoder, the drive can monitor the motor’s actual position directly, closing the feedback loop and avoiding many of the limitations traditionally associated with stepper systems.

AMP STAC5 with motor and encoder

By adding an encoder to the system to track rotor position, the drive can know precisely how far and how fast the motor has moved.  Thus, the first use of encoder feedback is position and velocity verification.  A PC or PLC can monitor position and velocity over RS-232, RS-485, CANopen, Ethernet or EtherNet/IP.

A step motor is constructed with a permanent magnet rotor that turns on bearings, and a stator, a series of electromagnets surrounding the rotor.  When the drive sends electric current through the stator, the resulting electromagnetic field forces the rotor to react.  If the stator current is properly controlled, a step motor can perform impressive feats, accelerating at precise rates to exact speeds, and stopping on a dime with great accuracy.

Because step motors produce less torque at high speeds, they can stall if overloaded.  The second use of encoder feedback is the immediate detection and reporting of stalls.  The driver can be configured to signal other equipment by the state change of a digital output or by providing this information over the communication interface. 

The encoder also allows for real time monitoring of the torque producing lead/lag angle, the angular difference between the magnetic fields of the stator and rotor.  Applied Motion drives can use this information to precisely control the motor’s torque and prevent unexpected motor stalls, the third and ultimate use of encoder feedback.  Stall prevention is enabled by checking the “Stall Prevention” box in our ST Configurator™ set up software.

Encoders can be purchased with Applied Motion motors ranging from NEMA size 11 to 34.  The encoder comes pre-assembled to the rear shaft of the step motor and connects  via cable to the encoder feedback port available on many of our drives, including our DC powered ST5  and ST10 and the AC powered STAC5 and STAC6.

Click on the link below for additional information-

Applied Motion Products’ Product Family

For more information, please contact:

EDITORIAL CONTACT:
Warren Osak
sales@servo2go.com 
Toll Free Phone:   877-378-0240
Toll Free Fax:       877-378-0249
www.servo2go.com

Sensorless Homing in Integrated Stepper Motors March 16, 2012

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Integrated Stepper Motor's from Applied Motion ProductsDigital Signal Processing (DSP) provides the foundation for much of the latest stepper control innovation. Precision current control via custom algorithms within the DSP and encoder feedback allow today’s stepper drive technology to detect stalling of a step motor.  Applied Motion Products takes this technology a step further by providing the logic necessary to allow user control of the system current in a near-stall situation to ride through or prevent most stall conditions.

One additional benefit to the stall detection current control is the ability to apply user logic via Q Programmer. Moving to a hard stop, with stall detection enabled, provides the ability to detect a stall situation relative to position and reverse off of a hard stop to a predictable and repeatable home position.  User selectable idle and running currents provide a quiet and smooth homing routine eliminating noise and vibration at end stops improving motion control accuracy and reliability through intelligent fault recovery.  Adding an encoder to any Applied Motion Products stepper motor with today’s current control (provided by proprietary algorithms in the Applied Motion Products DSP) allows for stall detection, stall prevention, and sensorless homing in Integrated Stepper Motors. 

Click on the link below for additional information-

Integrated Stepper Motors from Applied Motion Products

For more information, please contact:

EDITORIAL CONTACT:
Warren Osak
sales@servo2go.com 
Toll Free Phone:   877-378-0240
Toll Free Fax:       877-378-0249
www.servo2go.com

Nippon Pulse Geared Stepper Motors, High Torque in Small Package March 7, 2012

Posted by Servo2Go.com in New Product Press Releases, Uncategorized.
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A feature of Nippon Pulse’s popular and reliable stepper motors, which we have been manufacturing since 1960, is the ability to add reduction gearheads.  These gearheads have a wide range of ratios, from 1/400 to 6/25.  In all, there are over 20 different gear ratios to choose from, depending on the motor size.Geared Tin-Can Step Motor

Maximum torques range from 10mN·m to 2500mN·m, depending on the size of the motor and the gear ratio.  In addition to choosing from the different motor sizes and ratios, we also offer over 30 customized modifications, including shafts with flats and thruholes, coil windings, variable lead lengths, and lead wire connectors.

There are a variety of applications suited to integrate our geared stepper motors, including valve control, lens focusing, and fluid pumps.  Industries also using Nippon Pulse geared motors include gaming, medical, office automation, and metrology. Geared options are available on any of our standard tin-can stepper motors, which range in size from 20mm to 55mm.

Features of Nippon Pulses’s geared tin-can stepper motors include:

  • Over 20 different gear ratios to choose from
  • Maximum torque range from 10mN·m to 2500mN·m
  • Customizable lead wires, flanges, and shafts
  • Easy and inexpensive to drive and control
  • Easily and affordably integrated into a variety of systems
  • Reliable and durable
  • Gear reduction ratios from 6/25 to 1/300

Maximum Torques for Nippon Pulses’s geared tin-can stepper motors: 

 
 

Click on the link below for additional information-

Nippon Pulse’s Geared Tin-Can Stepper Motors

For more information, please contact:

EDITORIAL CONTACT:
Warren Osak
sales@servo2go.com 
Toll Free Phone:   877-378-0240
Toll Free Fax:       877-378-0249
www.servo2go.com

Linear Stepper Motors Offer Large Driving Forces at Cost Effective Price March 3, 2012

Posted by Servo2Go.com in New Product Press Releases, Product Video's.
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Nippon Pulse’s linear stepper series provides a simple motion system at a fraction of the cost of conventional rotary stepper motors and traditional linear motion systems. Our LINEARSTEP® series are permanent magnet type stepper motors that enable linear motions without the need for external transformers. The LINEARSTEP® series offers a wide range of customizable options, including various screw pitches, screw lengths, bipolar or unipolar windings, and several operating voltages.
Nippon Pulse Linear Stepper Motor
Because of its ball bearing support and strong motor case, the LINEARSTEP® series provides you with durability and a long operating life. With an enhanced Neodymium rotor magnet, the LINEARSTEP® series also offers a large driving force, up to 39.5N at 200pps. These linear motors can be controlled and driven by the same electronics used for rotary stepper motors.

Features of Nippon Pulse’s Linear Stepper Motors include:

• Two motor sizes, 25mm and 35mm
• Bipolar and Unipolar windings
• Three thread pitches (0.48mm, 0.96mm, 1.20mm)
• 30mm and 60mm effective stroke lengths
• 12V and 5V coil ratings
• 24 or 48 steps per revolution
• Forces between 8N and 39.5N (at 200pps)
• Travel per step between 0.01mm and 0.05mm
• Step angles of 7.5° and 15°
• Rated current between 0.10A/F and 0.42A/F

Typical applications include:

• Microtiting tables
• XY stages
• Liquid dispensing devices
• Medical pumps
• Analysis machines
• Control valves
• Semiconductor wafer handling machines
• Data storage recorders
• Industrial Laser Welding
• Medical Device Welding
• Printing equipment

Video:

The Nippon Pulse LINEARSTEP® series can be used in a wide range of applications, including biomedical handling and liquid dispensing. In this video, you can see two Nippon Pulse linear stepper motors, on one long shaft, being used as a test tube handler. Also included on this demo unit is a Nippon Pulse geared stepper motor.

 

Click on the link below for additional information-

Nippon Pulse’s Linear Stepper Motors

For more information, please contact:

EDITORIAL CONTACT:
Warren Osak
sales@servo2go.com 
Toll Free Phone:   877-378-0240
Toll Free Fax:       877-378-0249
www.servo2go.com